WHO WILL BE NINGTHOU – story in English

Long, long ago, in the land of Kangleipak in Manipur, there lived a Ningthou and a Leima. They were loved dearly by the people.
The Ningthou and Leima, on their part, never stopped thinking about their meeyam their people. “Our meeyam should be happy,” they said.
The people were not the only ones who loved their Ningthou and Leima. The birds and animals too loved them. The Ningthou and Leima always said: “Everybody in Kangleipak should live in peace. Not only the people, but the birds, animals and trees.”
Their beloved king and queen had three sons: Sanajaoba, Sanayaima and Sanatomba. Twelve years later, a daughter was born. She was named Sanatombi. She was a lovely child, soft and beautiful inside. She was loved by one and all.
The years went by, and the children grew up well. And then one day, the Ningthou called all his ministers and said: “It is now time to decide the Tunggi Ningthou, the future king.”
The ministers were shocked. “But O Ningthou, what is there to decide? Sanajaoba, your eldest son, will be our future king.”
“Well,” the Ningthou replied. “That’s how it happened in the old days. The eldest son always became the king. But times have changed. So let us select a king who is most worthy of becoming a king.”
“We will have a contest to select the future king,” the Leima said, and so, in the land of Kangleipak, there was a contest, a horse race.
Whoever reached the khongnang, the banyan tree, first would be declared Tunggi Ningthou. But then, a strange thing happened. Sanajaoba, Sanayaima and Sanatomba all three of them finished the race together. They were expert riders and all three reached the finish line at the same time!
There was great excitement. “Look at them!” the people shouted, “Shagol thauba nupa, such fine horsemen!”
But one question remained; Who would be the Tunggi Ningthou?
The Ningthou and Leima turned to their sons. The Ningthou said, “Sanajaoba. Sanayaima and Sanatomba, you have proved that you are fine horsemen. Do something different each one of you, so that we can decide who will be Tunggi Ningthou.” Suddenly, Sanajaoba mounted his horse and held his spear straight in front of him. He looked around. There was a hush among people. “What is Sanajaoba, the eldest, going to do? They thought to themselves.
Sanajaoba then looked at the huge khongnang standing majestically in the distance. He pierced the tree and jumped his horse right through it!
“Bravo! Bravo!” The people shouted, “Thouro! Thouro! And then they fell silent.
Now it was the turn of the second son, Sanayaima. What would he do? Sanayaima too looked at the khongnang as he mounted his horse. Then he too rode towards the tree, harder and harder. The people watched in silence, afraid even to breathe. When he was really close, he urged his horse to jump. Higher and higher the horse rose until horse and rider jumped clear over the huge tree and landed on the other side in a wonderful motion.
The People breathed in relief and said in unison: Phajei! Phajei! Wonderful! Wonderful!
And now, it was the turn of the youngest son, Sanatomba. He, too, rode his horse towards the khongnang and, before anybody knew what was happening, uprooted it. Triumphantly he carried the tree to the Ningthou and Leima and laid it at their feet! Shouts of Thouro! Thouro! Phajei! Phajei!” filled the mountains.
The people grew restless. Why were the Ningthou and the Leima taking so long to make the announcement?
They craned their necks to see what was happening. The Ningthou and Leima were watching Sanatombi, their five year-old daughter. She looked sad and lonely. She stared at the khongnang which lay dead by the throne. Birds flapped worriedly around, searching for their homes in the tree. Sanatombi walked up to the khongnang and whispered, “The khongnang is dead. It was hurt by the spear and now it is dead.
The people were all attention. The Ningthou stood up. He looked at the three boys. He looked at the little girl. He turned to the people. “If anybody is worthy of becoming the ruler,” he said, “it is little Sanatombi. It was she who told us to look at the soul of the khongnang. Sanatombi feels the pain of others. She feels the pain of the people, the animals, the birds, the trees.”
“I declare Sanatombi the future Leima of Kangleipak,” the Ningthou said. A silence fell. Everyone turned to look at the little girl, their future queen. There she stood, all of five, like a small khongnang, with birds flying all around her. They sat on her shoulders and on her head. She held out her hands full of grain and the birds flapped about her, pecking at the food.
“A Leima is one who doesn’t hurt anybody in the kingdom.”

Malu Bhalu – English poem Kamla Bhasin

High up in an icy lair

Lived a little polar bear

Snow white, snow bright was her mane,

Malu Bhalu was her name.

Very soon our Malu Bhalu

Learnt the things her parents knew.

Fish to catch, big and small…

Malu was a clever girl.

Malu said to her mother one day:

Ma, I’m going far out to play.

I want to see the things that lie

There beyond the big blue sky.

A little patience, child, said Mum.

In the summer when next it comes.

Summer?… Patience?… What a test!

Malu simply could not rest.

First things first! Malu’s mum

Clasped Malu tight within her arms.

Then she said — her voice was firm

Now my dear you’ll have to swim

But Ma! said Malu, what do I know?

How will I? I’ve never swum before!

Don’t worry dear, said Malu’s moth

Do as I do, that’s all, she advised her

She had no choice, no other way,

Malu had to swim that day.

Tight she gripped her mother’s hand.

Into the water, splash! to land.

Brave mother’s brave young daughter!

Doubt and fear she left behind her..

Malu swam with all her might,

It didn’t matter wrong or right.

But swimming came so naturally,

Her mother knew this and all could see.

Fearless was Malu, this she knew.

Not just brave, but special too.

Rip Van winkle – Kid story

Many years ago, at the foothills of the Kaatskill (Kat-skill) mountains, was a little village. In the village lived a simple, good-natured fellow named Rip Van Winkle. He was a kind neighbour, ready to help anyone. Everyone in the village liked him. The children of the village shouted with joy whenever they saw him because he played with them, he taught them to fly kites and shoot marbles, and told them long stories.
The only problem with Rip was that he was very lazy. He did not work on his own farm and just idled away his time. His fences were falling to pieces. His cow was going astray. Weeds grew on his farm. Rip’s constant
companion was his dog, named Wolf. To avoid work, he would walk away into the forest with his dog.
One day. Rip just walked on and on and reached the highest part of the mountains. It was late in the afternoon when he reached there. Tired after his long climb, he lay down and began daydreaming. It was soon
evening and he realised it would be night by the time he reached his village.
Suddenly, he heard a voice calling out, “Rip Van Winkle, Rip Van Winkle!’ He looked around and saw a short, old man, with thick hair and a grizzled beard walking towards him with a barrel. He made signs to help him carry the barrel. Rip hurried to help the stranger who caught his hand tightly. Together they reached a place where there were some more odd looking men, playing ninepins. They were all dressed the same way and all of them had beards of various shapes and colours. Even though they were  playing a game, their faces were serious and there was silence! The only sound was the noise of the balls, which echoed in the mountains like thunder.
As Rip and his companion reached them, they stopped playing and stared at Rip with a fixed gaze. Rip was really frightened. His companion emptied the contents of the barrel into glasses and made Rip drink it.
Rip obeyed as he was trembling with fear. Since he was thirsty he drank a few more glasses and slowly fell into a deep sleep.
On waking up, he found that he was at the place where he had first met the old man. He rubbed his eyes — it was a bright sunny morning. “Surely, I have not slept here all night,” thought Rip.
He looked around for Wolf, but he was nowhere. Rip whistled for him. “Wolf! Wolf!” he then shouted. No dog was to be seen. “Where has this dog gone?” he muttered to himself. He began to descend the mountain to go back to his village.
As he neared the village, he met a number of people but he didn’t know any of them. The villagers also stared at him equally surprised. “Who is this man?” said one.
“I’ve never seen him before,” said another, “look at his long white beard and his wrinkled face.”
On hearing this, Rip stroked his chin and, to his astonishment, he found his beard had grown a foot long, and it was all white!
An old woman walked up to him and looked at his face for a moment. Then she exclaimed — “It is Rip Van Winkle! Welcome home again, old neighbour! Where have you been these twenty long years?

Many years ago, at the foothills of the Kaatskill (Kat-skill) mountains, was a little village. In the village lived a simple, good-natured fellow named Rip Van Winkle. He was a kind neighbour, ready to help anyone. Everyone in the village liked him. The children of the village shouted with joy whenever they saw him because he played with them, he taught them to fly kites and shoot marbles, and told them long stories.
The only problem with Rip was that he was very lazy. He did not work on his own farm and just idled away his time. His fences were falling to pieces. His cow was going astray. Weeds grew on his farm. Rip’s constantcompanion was his dog, named Wolf. To avoid work, he would walk away into the forest with his dog.
One day. Rip just walked on and on and reached the highest part of the mountains. It was late in the afternoon when he reached there. Tired after his long climb, he lay down and began daydreaming. It was soonevening and he realised it would be night by the time he reached his village.
Suddenly, he heard a voice calling out, “Rip Van Winkle, Rip Van Winkle!’ He looked around and saw a short, old man, with thick hair and a grizzled beard walking towards him with a barrel. He made signs to help him carry the barrel. Rip hurried to help the stranger who caught his hand tightly. Together they reached a place where there were some more odd looking men, playing ninepins. They were all dressed the same way and all of them had beards of various shapes and colours. Even though they were  playing a game, their faces were serious and there was silence! The only sound was the noise of the balls, which echoed in the mountains like thunder.
As Rip and his companion reached them, they stopped playing and stared at Rip with a fixed gaze. Rip was really frightened. His companion emptied the contents of the barrel into glasses and made Rip drink it.Rip obeyed as he was trembling with fear. Since he was thirsty he drank a few more glasses and slowly fell into a deep sleep.
On waking up, he found that he was at the place where he had first met the old man. He rubbed his eyes — it was a bright sunny morning. “Surely, I have not slept here all night,” thought Rip.
He looked around for Wolf, but he was nowhere. Rip whistled for him. “Wolf! Wolf!” he then shouted. No dog was to be seen. “Where has this dog gone?” he muttered to himself. He began to descend the mountain to go back to his village.
As he neared the village, he met a number of people but he didn’t know any of them. The villagers also stared at him equally surprised. “Who is this man?” said one.
“I’ve never seen him before,” said another, “look at his long white beard and his wrinkled face.”
On hearing this, Rip stroked his chin and, to his astonishment, he found his beard had grown a foot long, and it was all white!
An old woman walked up to him and looked at his face for a moment. Then she exclaimed — “It is Rip Van Winkle! Welcome home again, old neighbour! Where have you been these twenty long years?

English poem – Lazy frog

Fred is a very lazy frog
Who lolls all day upon a log.
He always manages to shirk
Doing a single stroke of work.
His poor old mother calls in vain

“Come in and help!” he does not bother
To move two inches, much preferring
To be extremely hard-of-hearing.
He lies there in a silent heap.
And stays conveniently asleep.

If a lady frog hops past
You’d think he would get up at last
To bow, and help her on her way?
But no, I am ashamed to say
That when a lady frog comes by
He does not open up one eye!

Crying – English poem

Crying only a little bit
is no use. You must cry
until your pillow is soaked!
Then you can jump in the shower

and splash-splash-splash!

Then you can throw open

your window
and, “Ha, ha! ha ha!”
And if people say, “Hey,
what’s going on up there?”
“Ha ha!” sing back, “Happiness
was hiding in the last tear!

I wept it! Ha ha!”

Galway Kinnell

English story – Robinson Crusoe

One day, when I was going towards my boat, I was surprised to see the footprint of a man on the sand.

I stood amazed! I listened; I looked around me; I could neither hear nor see anything.

I went up higher to look down; I went up the shore and down the shore, but it was no good;

I could find no other footprint but that one. I went to it again to see if there were any more footprints
and to tell if it had been my imagination. But I was not mistaken, for there was exactly the print of a foot — toes,heel, every part of a foot. I could not imagine how it came there.

I stayed a long time thinking, but became more and more confused.

At last I returned home very frightened, looking behind me after every two or three steps, mistaking every bush and tree to be a man.

When I, came to my cave (which I called my castle), I ran inside it, as if I was being chased.

I do not remember whether I used the ladder or went in by the hole in the rock, which I called the door. I ran for cover, faster than any animal could run.

I did not sleep that night. The more I thought about what I had seen, the more afraid I became. I thought it

could be one of the savages of the mainland who had wandered out to the sea, in a small boat.

Luckily I was not on shore at that time, but what if he had seen my boat! If he had seen the boat he would have realized that someone lived on the island and would soon return with others to kill and eat me.

And so I lay fearful for many days and prayed for protection. In doing so, I was much comforted and began
going out to investigate. But even now as I went forward, I looked behind me frequently, because I was still very frightened.

However, as I went about for two or three days and saw nothing I became a little bolder. I decided to go down o the shore again and examine the footprint once more. I decided to measure it with my own footmark.
As I came closer to the footprint, I realised that it could not be my footprint because I had not come to this part of the beach since a long time. Secondly, as I placed my foot alongside that footprint, it seemed larger than my own.

My fear returned! I went home again, believing that there was someone there.

The island was inhabited!

The Friends – Children time pass story

Two friends, Hemant and Vikas, planned to go hiking in the woods. They packed their knapsacks, lugged them over their shoulders and started out.

One evening, while walking through the dense forest, they heard a bear growl. They were very scared and started to run away, but “Twick, twick”, they could hear the twigs breaking with each step the bear took towards them.

Desperate, Hemant saw a low branch hanging from a tree. He quickly caught hold of the life-saving branch and climbed on top of the tree as soon as possible. He was so scared that he did not even look at his friend once.

The Friends of Custard House, Stories for kids: 137_1.gifVikas, who was behind the first, was not so lucky. The bear was right behind him and when he saw Hemant save himself, all he could think of doing was to was to throw himself flat on the ground.

And that’s how the bear found him. Face down on the ground and not even daring to breathe. The bear put his nose close to Vikas’ ear – and then he sniffed and sniffed and sniffed. He was trying to make out whether Vikas was just pretending or if he was dead.

Then finally he stopped sniffing. Vikas dared to take small breath. Then the bear growled, and Vikas’ blood ran cold.

But by then the bear had decided that Vikas was not alive and it is well-known that bears will not touch dead meat. So the bear slouched off into the forest.

Seeing that the worst of the danger was over, Hemant slowly climbed down the tree where he was hiding. Walking up to Vikas, who was still so shaken up that he could hardly stand, Hemant he laughingly asked, “Hey, what did Master Bear whisper to you?”

Vikas gave Hemant a long steady look. “He told me,” said Vikas very slowly, “never to trust a friend who deserts you at the first opportunity he gets. So, if you’ll excuse me…” Saying that, Vikas picked himself up, brushed off the dust, and walked away.

The Cookie – Story of small girl

The dining table was loaded with goodies – cake, pastries, pies, halwa, laddoo and yes, her favourite cookies. Nina wanted to eat them all. The 10-year-old stuffed a couple of cookies in her mouth but the cookies tasted a little different. No matter how hard she tried, she couldn’t gulp them down.

The dream broke at that point.

Nina woke up with a start and found herself chewing on a bed sheet. She was in her dormitory bed and it was pitch dark. A grumbling stomach reminded her of how terribly hungry she was. All because of Mr. Katiyaar, the poker-faced warden of the residential school which had been her home for the last one year.

The Cookie, Stories for kids: 139_1.gifHe had found Nina talking during dinner time and had punished her by asking her to go hungry to bed. Nothing escaped the eagle-eyed warden.

And now this dream which had made her hungrier. Nina paced up and down her dormitory in desperation. She looked enviously at roommates, peacefully asleep with their stomachs full.

Suddenly Nina remembered a box of cookies sent by her mother, that was lying in her locker. She had been hiding it from her friends for an emergency. Clearly, this was an emergency.

The locker room was at the extreme end of the long corridor, and venturing out in the dark and creepy hallway was nothing short of climbing Mount Everest. Nina took her first trembling step towards the doorway and almost ran back. She remembered a boy from her class bragging about his encounter with a ghost while he was on his way to the toilet at night.

But her stomach egged her on. The same hallway in the morning never looked so eerie, thought Nina. Pale with fright, the girl scout walked on and tried not to think about the ghosts and witches that could lurking around in a corner somewhere.

At last she reached the locker room. Slowly turning the doorknob, Nina stepped into the dark room, let out a sigh of relief and walked towards her locker. So familiar was she with her locker that she could locate it with her eyes shut.

Then a sound almost made her jump with fright. “It’s nothing but my imagination,” she assured herself. Again something rustled and moved in the room. Someone was there in the room, and Nina trembled with fear. Probably it was that ghost who frequented the corridor. She decided to grab her box of cookies and run back to her room.

Sweating with fear, Nina gripped the locker door and yanked it open. And she got the fright of her life – someone was sitting inside her locker! Even in the dark she could make out a pair of eyes like hers. So the corridor ghost lives in my locker, Nina thought in horror.

She let out a piercing scream. And to her surprise the ghost started yelling back. Hey, ghosts are not supposed to scream but make frightening noises, she thought. Nina’s mouth fell open in surprise and there was a silence in the room for a moment. The locker door swung back into its place.

Before she could think of anything, the door burst open and a swarm of students and teachers flooded the room. All the lights were switched on in a minute.
“What’s the matter?” growled the warden. He certainly looked displeased at having been woken up from his deep slumber. “There there… is a ghost in my locker,” Nina mumbled.

At the mention of the word ghost, half the students stepped back. Only the brave ones remained to witness the historic event.

“There is no such thing as ghost in this world,” said Mr. Katiyaar, looking more furious than ever. As everyone waited with bated breath, he took a hesitant step towards the locker and yanked open the door.

The Cookie, Stories for kids: 139_2.gifThe ghost looked familiar…It was Rajan, Nina’s classmate, sitting inside the spacious locker, her box of cookies clutched in his arms!

“What the hell are you doing here?” Mr. Katiyaar shouted, momentarily forgetting the ‘no swear word’ rule made by him. The boy dropped the box on the floor. He was shaking with fear. “He can’t speak, his mouth is full of cookies,” said one of the students, helpfully.

Nina suddenly remembered that Rajan, too, had been given the ‘no dinner’ punishement that evening for reaching the dining hall late.

“I can see that his mouth is full, but eating cookies and walking down the corridor at this hour defies every logic and rule, and as a punishment both Nina and Rajan will stay away from breakfast tomorrow morning,” roared said Mr. Katiyaar.

“Hold on for a minute, Mr. Katiyaar.” It was Mrs Verma, a teacher. “Do you realise that keeping children hungry for their mistakes leads them to do such things? A day begun without breakfast would make them more desperate. They might try to force some more lockers open, even yours.”

She had a better idea. “Why don’t we ask Rajan to make everyone’s bed for filching the cookies. And Nina can serve food to everyone at the breakfast because she got out of her room at night. That would solve your purpose, would it not,” she asked looking at the warden.

To everyone’s relief Mr. Katiyaar seemed to understand and moreover, surprised all the students and teachers alike by treating them to a warm glass of milk and the remaining cookies from Nina’s box!

There wasn’t a happier girl in the hostel who went to sleep, stomach full, that night!

Long bony fingers – Children story list

Somu loved to read ghost stories. Every time he paid a visit to the library, he got back a teeth-chattering horror tale. It was a signal that he was getting ready to play a scary trick on his friends. He was 10 years old.

His parents had learnt to recognise the signs now. The days on which the slim boy’s cocker spaniel eyes shone brighter than ever, and his brown wavy hair seemed to have a movement of their own, they knew that he must have read a ghost tale and was hatching a plot to scare someone.

The problem was that Somu loved reading. And so he did a lot of scaring too. But he was liked for his funny jokes and his helpful nature, so no one really minded. Though a few friends had often thought of making him feel a sense of fear. Fear that was very different from sitting in bed with a whole lot of munchies, bedsheet pulled up to the chin and reading a story for the pleasure of its thrills.

One day Somu’s friend Pavan asked him over to his house after school. Somu’s mum and dad said he could go – but they told him to come home before dark.

Long Bony Fingers, Stories for kids: 141_1.gif“Remember, now,” said his dad, “you’ll have to walk home through the park.” (something about the park….)

Promising he’d leave early, Somu set off for his friend’s house. He had a great time reading stories and looking at the pictures in some of Pavan’s exciting monster books. Time flew by and when Somu looked up he saw it was pitch dark.

“Oh no!” he gasped. “I have to get home”!

Somu began to walk along the path through the park that had fallen eerily silent. How dark it was. Why couldn’t the park officials put some lights? And then remembered that most of the park lights had been broken by them during their inter-locality cricket matches. In fact, if a boy succeeded in breaking a park light with a soaring sixer, he was considered a hero! Now it didn’t seem a bright idea any more. Especially when the chirping sound of the crickets had become deafening. If someone came up behind him, he wouldn’t be able to hear their footsteps.

And then he heard that noise. It came from behind.

It was a human voice.

“Guess what I can do with my long bony finger and my long pointed teeth”?

Somu yelped and started to run, but the pounding footsteps followed him. Finally, out of breath, he stopped and asked in a quavering voice:

“Who’s there”?

But all he heard was the voice saying:

“Guess what I can do with my long bony finger and my long pointed teeth”?

Somu started running again. The footsteps followed behind him. Once more he stopped and asked, “Who’s there”?

“Guess what I can do with my long bony finger and my long pointed teeth”? Again the same thing. Why couldn’t he say something else!

Poor Somu took to his heels again. As usual, when he got a stitch in his stomach he stopped and asked, “Look, who is it?”

“Guess what I can do with my long bony finger and my long pointed teeth”?

Long Bony Fingers, Stories for kids: 141_2.gifSomu ran down the path and found himself at his doorstep. But it was locked! And the footsteps were right behind him. With no more strength left in him Somu stood there and asked, “Who’s there”?

“Guess what I can do with my long bony finger and my long pointed teeth”?

Somu gulped and gathered his last bit of courage to ask, “Who are you and what can you do with your long bony finger and your long pointed teeth”?

BmBmBmBmBmBmBmBmBmBm…Hahahahahahaahhaha, went the monster.

Somu closed his ears and eyes and sat on his doorstep in fear. Then he opened his left eye a teeny weeny bit. The monster was right before him. He seemed to be wearing black trousers turned up at the end, as was fashionable. As his eyes climbed up the ghost’s figure, he got a shock.

It was his father!

“Somu, did I not tell you to come home before dark?” said dad.

“You did, Daddy”, sniffed Somu.

Well, I thought I would sneak up on you and give you a scare for a change, just like you do to others after reading one of your horror tales!”, said Somu’s dad.

Somu looked at his father for a long time. And then they went inside the house making monster noises.

BmBmBmBmBmBmBmBmBmBm…

Toys For a Big Boy – Small story in English

Ronit Subramanian was seven years old and he was the tallest student in his class. It made him feel very proud. But when he remembered some of the things he used to do as a small kid, he felt a little shy. He wished his mother would not tell those stories to her friends again and again.

Last week his mother’s old school friend had come to see her. They were meeting after 10 years. Ronit was just back from school but his ears pricked up when he heard his mother say in that goofy tone, “You know what my Ronit used to do as a baby? He used to think everything and everyone was a part of the Subramanian family. So he would call the refrigerator ‘frig Subramanian. And he would call the doggy that curled up on our doormat outside ‘doggy Subramanian’”. Ronit heard his mother’s friend say, “cho chweeeet” and he ran out of the house – without any lunch. “I wish mother would not do these things,” he said for the thousandth time.

Toys For a Big Boy, Stories for kids: 145_1.gifThat evening his mother showed him the toys and games her friend had got for him. One stuffed dolphin and a game of blocks. Ronit got angry. “These are kids toys, kids toys and games. I am a big boy now. My hero is Spiderman. That’s the toy I want for my birthday this year. Spiderman and the spray that makes the spider web.”

“Are you saying you no longer want your favourite stuffed toy – pepper the doggy?” Ronit’s mother asked. “I don’t want kids toys, I don’t want kids toys and games any more. I am a BIG BOY,” Ronit shouted. ‘Okay, okay, we heard you,” said his parents.

A month later, Ronit’s parents bought him a Spiderman kit for his eighth birthday. They bought him a Spiderman T-shirt and trousers, a shiny Spiderman toy and a glove with a spray bottle attached to it. “Wear the glove and then press the spray button. It will make a web pattern on the wall, Ronit’s father said. Ronit, and even his father, were so excited with the spray that they used it again and again to see who could make a bigger web! There was even a Spiderman cake.

After his friends left, Ronit opened up each gift package. Yesssss! He was a big boy now. He had got so many presents of toys and games and they were all for big boys. He especially like a Lego set that made a battery-powered robot, a snazzy car racing video game, and, best of all, a cool skateboard. Ronit went to sleep clutching the Spiderman. You see he had decided he no longer wanted his favourite stuffed toy, Pepper doggy.

Toys For a Big Boy, Stories for kids: 145_2.jpgAs soon as his head hit the pillow Ronit fell asleep. He now slept in a room of his own. A room with sunny yellow walls. But until yesterday, he had gone to sleep clutching Pepper doggy’s ear. The softness of the toy always made him happy. But Spiderman was a metal toy. It was cold to touch. At night, as Ronit’s blanket slipped down the bed, the cold metal of Spiderman poked him. Ronit dreamt that he was being chased by icy monsters who were out to freeze him into a statue. In his dream he shouted for Pepper. Not finding Pepper, woke up screaming crying.

His mother heard him whimper and came rushing into his room. “I want Pepper. He is my friend. Big boys also have doggy friends” cried Ronit. Pepper has crept back into Ronit’s bed. Every night, Ronit and Pepper have a new adventure. In his dreams, Ronit sees Pepper in a Spiderman outfit. Isn’t that cool?